Can that be real?

When reading a news post on the web, I often have occasion to ask myself "Can that be real?" or "Is this true?" and I'm often thinking about the image accompanying the post (as well as the post itself). "Can that be real?" can have two meanings - does this image come from the context the text describes, and/or has it been "photoshopped" - altered in some way. Luke Winkie has written a very informative post about 3 easy ways to tell if a ...

Literally a Digital Citizen

"A country without boarders" Talin, Estonia. creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by archer10 (Dennis): http://flickr.com/photos/archer10/4066976166 A story in the Guardian this morning made me laugh, and then think! "On 21 October, Estonia’s parliament unanimously voted to extend national digital e-residency rights to foreigners by the end of the year. With this e-residency programme, the least populous country in Europe, of 1.3 million people, intends to attract around 10 million “digital citizens” by 2025." (Read the entire post at this link.) Up until now, ...

We live in media…using Twitter

Yesterday morning I read a handful of  interesting posts about Twitter, and found the poster shown at the left,  by Tom Woodward. As it all followed on a long Skype conversation with a colleague about Twitter, I felt that all the signs were pointing to  today's blog post focusing on Twitter. Quick catch up, or background info: "Twitter is an online social networking and microblogging service that enables users to send and read short 140-character text messages, called "tweets". Registered users can ...

Working in the Slums – IPPs

Back in November 2013 a colleague of mine wanted to discuss working in a deprived area of India to run workshops with street kids. I suggested that we do a trial run of a day (he had a 3 day event in mind) of workshops to see what is wanted and what how the language barrier is (as the majority of the people that live in Dharavi, the slum near to my school) speak Hindi and Marathi. Then I had ...

Your morning java & justice…

Prior to continuing on with tourism, I am going to side-step into highlighting an exploding field within anthropology: the study of fair trade. More specifically, there is a great deal of writing on the subject of coffee. Here are three sources to get students thinking about their morning cup… … Krystal D’Costa’s talk on The Anthropology of Coffee. Krystal is now staff blogger for Scientific American, where she also posted on this topic. Sarah Lyon’s Coffee and Community (focused on Mayan communities) ...

Tourism – a little reading for the holidays

Despite a faltering global economy, the UN World Tourism Organization estimates that international tourist arrivals will top one billion in 2012. Moreover, they project that between 35 and 40 percent of these arrivals will involve cultural, archaeological, or heritage tourism in some way, shape, or form. Christian Wells  This week, students in the Northern Hemisphere will write their final examinations. As their pens lift off the paper, their thoughts will inevitably turn to the holidays ahead. With this in mind, I ...

Update on Amber Case

From earliest times, humans had tools like hammers that extended our physical self. Today’s technology extends our mental self. It’s changing the way we experience the world. —Amber Case Each year, National Geographic recognizes visionary individuals who are actively working toward global problem-solving. The recipients do not apply, they are nominated by a panel of experts. This year, Cyborg Anthropologist Amber Case tops the list of 15. Read more here.