The IB Learner Profile, ATL and Anti-Plagiarism Software

I recently found myself involved in the review of a school's Academic Honesty Policy, which led me to some background reading, which (as often happens) caused me to fall down an internet rabbit hole: First stop: NPR ED "Turnitin And The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software" (August 25, 2014, Heard on All Things Considered) [audio mp3="http://blogs.osc-ib.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/20140825_atc_turnitin_and_the_high-tech_plagiarism_debate.mp3"] Coming as I do from the IB world, this phrase in the post caught my eye: The fact that anti-plagiarism software can't tell the difference between accidental and intentional plagiarism is just one reason ...

Are these in your Google Docs universe?

In a clever post from the Google for Work Official Blog, Looking back at Marie Curie’s radical discovery: How the Mother of Modern Physics might have used Google Apps, "we imagine how Marie Curie’s discovery of radioactivity, which won a Nobel Prize and revolutionized modern cancer treatment, might have played out in a Google Apps universe."  I encourage you to follow the link, and read the post. Most of us are aware of the Google Chrome extensions and add-ons: did you know that ...

Using Public Domain Images

In August I wrote about how to cite  Creative Commons photos.  Today I'd like to investigate how or why to cite Public Domain photos.  The following is not to be taken as legal advice, but as general guidelines for academic work, in a school setting. Rights are country-specific, so there is no "one size fits all" discussion of this topic.  Wikipedia begins the page on Public Domain with this paragraph: "Works in the public domain are those whose exclusive intellectual property rights ...

How should I cite this photo?

I recently read a blog post that featured this cute picture of 2 meerkats.  I couldn't see an image credit under the photo, so I looked at the bottom of the page, and found "Image source: Pixabay " This did not tell me enough about the image.  Clicking on the link, I learned that Pixabay is an online source of Creative Commons and stock images.  By doing a Google search for that image, I could find the precise URL of the meerkat image, https://pixabay.com/en/meerkat-animal-wild-wildlife-255564/ (as well as 402 ...