Cognition and Emotion – flashbulb memories

By Saturday, February 1, 2014 , , 0

This is a part of the syllabus that can be seen as complex by many students. One way in is to look first at Brown and Kulik's (1977) argument regarding flashbulb memory. This allows students to meet two learning outcomes: With reference to relevant research studies, to what extent is one cognitive process reliable? Evaluate one theory of how emotion may affect one cognitive process. There is a lot of material that is helpful here. This video is a good one ...

Cognition and Emotion – how are they related?

By Saturday, February 1, 2014 , , 0

The famous brain researcher Antonio Damasio explained that emotions are purely physical signals of the body which react to external stimuli. Feelings arise when the brain interprets these as "emotions". Emotions consist of three components: ● physiological changes, such as arousal of the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. (The person is usually unconscious of this at first). ● the person’s own subjective feeling of an emotion (e.g. happiness) ● associated behaviour, such as smiling or running away. One of the cognitive factors in ...

The Cognitive Level of Analysis

Happy New Year to all of you who are celebrating, or have just finished celebrating and are now starting a new term, and in some cases a new school year.  This blog post looks at the Cognitive Level of Analysis, and the cognitive process of memory. Memory is a useful process to study. Not only does it allow students to undertake all sorts of interesting memory tests that encourage engagement with the material, but controlled laboratory experiments on memory can ...

Cognition – is it all in the mind?

Wishing you all a very Happy New Year (if indeed it is New Year in your part of the world)! Have you made any resolutions, and if so, will you remember them in a week or two? Yes, we are looking at memory in this blog. Last term, the Psychology blogs focused on the brain and procrastination and the brain and behaviour, and gave some tips from examiners on how to succeed in exams and with your internally-assessed experiment.  Now we ...

The psychology of procrastination

By Sunday, September 1, 2013 , , , , 0

The semester/term starts soon, or has already started for those of you in the Northern hemisphere with IB exams in May. (I know that those students taking the IB Diploma exams in November have been in school a very long time, but this applies equally to you). Very soon the work will be coming in, but “Hey! Never do today what you can put off till tomorrow.” This is procrastination, and it is all about decisions – the argument in ...