The 5 Nots (Comparative Study HL)

In September I posted some thoughts about the Comparative Study – Six of the Best (comparative study issues and advice) This month I’m continuing that theme but focusing on criterion F, so I’m only talking really to those of you who are taking HIGHER LEVEL Visual Arts. Criterion F deals with making connections to your own art-making practice. *In July I posted a blog about what NOT to do in your exhibition - “When NOT to…” (Visual Arts Exhibition No Nos) Now I am posting ...

The Curious Rat (aka Curatorial Rationale)

My Visual Art students call it the Curious Rat, because "Curatorial Rationale" is a bit of a mouthful. Anyway, its March, and the digital upload ‘window’ for final examination submission of visual arts files is open – so it’s time for you (especially if you are a visual arts student in the final year of your course) to finalize your files! It’s a busy time and it may be tempting to focus on (for example) finishing some of the resolved artworks in your ...

A quick glimpses over some of the key ideas revealed in Visual pleasures and narrative cinema

The purpose of this article is to offer a brief explanation to some of key elements of Laura Mulvey's Visual Pleasures and narrative cinema. With particular reference to her points about how modes of cinema spectatorship and the suturing of audiences are inflected with masculine desires and pleasures, within films from the classic Hollywood period. This is a snapshot, and is no substitute for reading the original essay which provides far broader and clearer insights, and will offer a far stronger ...

Comparative Study Starting Points

If you are taking the new visual arts course by now you will probably have heard about the three components and learned some of the details. One thing you’re going to do is write and submit a COMPARATIVE STUDY. It counts for 20% of the final mark so does not contribute massively to a final grade, but it’s still worth taking seriously – 20% is still 20%. The examiner will be looking for analysis of formal qualities, interpretation of function and purpose, ...

COMPARING OLD AND NEW: 14 DIFFERENCES (part 1: today’s blog – the top 7)

In my last post, I wrote about the similarities between the old/current visual arts course and the new one starting any day now. You can find the post here.   However, there are also significant differences, so here I will discuss some of these. I have listed my first seven here. Some are obvious but others may not be. I am lining up another set of differences between the current and the new course for a future blog post. Stay tuned!   DIFFERENCES BETWEEN OLD/CURRENT AND NEW ...

Happy New Year (and farewell Option B – so long & thank you!)

Happy New year everyone! And yes – it’s a new start and a new year, but it’s also the end for some things, including the current visual arts course (final exams 2015) and in particular the B option, which does not figure in the new course. If you are a student now in your first year of DP visual arts, you are also among the last students to have the A or B choice. (The only choice in the new course will ...

2013 Examiner’s report – production portfolio

This years examiner's report offers the usual recurring complaints of the failure of candidates to meet the formal requirements for each assessment component, which are frankly unforgivable mostly of the teachers in supervising these candidates, as the requirements are clearly stated in the IB film guide. However this report is a mostly positive and well-written document and offers useful guidance for success of IB Film candidates in the future and recommendations for the teaching of this subject to IB. I'd recommend ...

The theme revisited!

I posted a blog about the THEME on June 25th in the STUDENT section of this blog site, and about a month later Marilyn posted a comment (and questions) in response to my blog Marilyn was/is surprised but some of the things I wrote, and questioned my authority to say such things. Fair enough - although Oxford Study Courses are actually quite particular about who they allow on their blog site! Anyway I replied to her questions (August 11th) - and have included ...

The IB Learner Profile (4) – Communicators

Communicators. The first thing that springs to mind (for me anyway) is talking - and as teachers, we all the know importance of talking! We need to ensure that our instructions to students are clear, concise and to the point in a very complicated system. But after thinking about communication more deeply, it is also important (arguably more so) in the way we communicate the written word. How clear our writing is on the board? How concise it is? How precise it ...

The IB Learner Profile 2 (Knowledgeable)

Knowledgeable - like most statements in the learner profile, this has obvious and not so obvious parts associated with it. Yes, we (teachers) and our students are knowledgeable about the subject material (admittedly, some parts we are more knowledgeable on than others!) but knowledgeable goes deeper than this. Knowledgeable is when we know what labs will work well and what won't work well. We know the pitfalls and mistakes people make and are able to pass this onto our students to stop ...