Written by cats and a hamster

It's Extended Essay time in the Northern Hemisphere (perhaps it's always Extended Essay time everywhere), and I'm sure that all students and supervisors are scrutinizing resources very carefully. How careful do you have to be? I thought I'd share these news stories... F.D.C. Willard's pawprint In 1975, The American physicist and mathematician Jack H. Hetherington, at Michigan State University, wanted to publish some of his research results in the field of low–temperature physics in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters. A colleague, who was ...

The IB Learner Profile, ATL and Anti-Plagiarism Software

I recently found myself involved in the review of a school's Academic Honesty Policy, which led me to some background reading, which (as often happens) caused me to fall down an internet rabbit hole: First stop: NPR ED "Turnitin And The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software" (August 25, 2014, Heard on All Things Considered) [audio mp3="http://blogs.osc-ib.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/20140825_atc_turnitin_and_the_high-tech_plagiarism_debate.mp3"] Coming as I do from the IB world, this phrase in the post caught my eye: The fact that anti-plagiarism software can't tell the difference between accidental and intentional plagiarism is just one reason ...

Separate the wheat from the chaff

In June I wrote a post for this blog titled Can this be real? about altered images, or misrepresenting images. Today in my ECIS Library Forum discussion thread,  a colleague in Switzerland posted about the explosion of fake academic journals. In the IB world, we are all involved in promoting digital citizenship, responsibility, honesty and integrity: We often use unusual but authentic, hoax, or "joke" websites like the following to teach or learn about "reliability" on the internet: Improbable Research: Feline Reactions to ...