Searching for the Truth

Continuing my thoughts and writing about fake news, fake web pages, teaching search skills, and ultimately, trying to find the Truth of a matter, this post brings together for your consideration two web articles which are not new, but which work well together. The first is Why Students Can't Google their Way to the Truth, by Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew, published 1 November 2016.  The authors describe their research at Stamford University: "Over the past 18 months, we administered assessments that ...

Choosing & Using Sources

This morning Nik Peachy shared a free, online or downloadable text book  Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research by Teaching & Learning, Ohio State University Libraries.   Thinking about the IB DP IA and EE work, I decided to have a look. "Choosing & Using Sources presents a process for academic research and writing, from formulating your research question to selecting good information and using it effectively in your research assignment. Additional chapters cover understanding types of sources, searching for ...

Alternative Facts

This week a post on The Adventures of Library Girl (a blog by written by Jennifer LaGarde,  the Lead School Library Media Coordinator/Digital Teaching and Learning Specialist for New Hanover County Schools in Wilmington, NC.) titled Fake News, Alternative Facts and Librarians As Dedicated Defenders of Truth pushed me to think about the idea of Fake News and how librarians, classroom teachers, ICT teachers and schools in general have been working for decades to help students sort the wheat from the chaff when ...

Differentiation with Social Media Tools

This week I was notified of a change on a shared Google Spreadsheet I "follow" which is collecting "Differentiation with Social Media Tools". As I write, there are  109 online social media tools listed, with the type, URL, a short assessment or review, and suggestions for content, process and product differentiation. The page was built and is maintained by John McCarthy, an Education Blogger  at Edutopia - George Lucas Educational Foundation. You can learn more about him on his web page. Linked to ...

A Framework for Information Literacy

I follow the Librarians forum on the ECIS moodle, where I read with great interest a recent post by Teacher - Librarian Pia Alliende, in which she shares the recently published (January 2016)  Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education published by the US Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. She writes about the document that "...it revises the more traditional definition of information literacy and I see on it all of the ...

Taking it with you

Two blog posts I read this morning reminded me again how important it is to think about the  longevity and permanence of our web work. Class Blogmeister Retires After a 12-Year Run from David Warlick was a real blast from the past.  I started blogging, and helping teachers think about using a blog as a tool in their classroom, in 2006-2007. Then, as now, privacy and supervision were major considerations, and David's Class Blogmeister has been a great service to classroom bloggers. 1,428,522 articles have been ...

Visual Arts Internal Assessment Upload: Quick Overview

It’s April! That means for many of us its VISUAL ARTS UPLOAD MONTH! Of the three components the most complex in terms of files and the upload process is the Exhibition The aim of this post is to give some explanations and guidance in relation to the scary IBIS Internal Assessment upload process. For more information about the visual arts upload please feel free to refer to my February post The Digital Upload: First Time For The New Course – What To Do! Please also ...

Using Public Domain Images

In August I wrote about how to cite  Creative Commons photos.  Today I'd like to investigate how or why to cite Public Domain photos.  The following is not to be taken as legal advice, but as general guidelines for academic work, in a school setting. Rights are country-specific, so there is no "one size fits all" discussion of this topic.  Wikipedia begins the page on Public Domain with this paragraph: "Works in the public domain are those whose exclusive intellectual property rights ...

Separate the wheat from the chaff

In June I wrote a post for this blog titled Can this be real? about altered images, or misrepresenting images. Today in my ECIS Library Forum discussion thread,  a colleague in Switzerland posted about the explosion of fake academic journals. In the IB world, we are all involved in promoting digital citizenship, responsibility, honesty and integrity: We often use unusual but authentic, hoax, or "joke" websites like the following to teach or learn about "reliability" on the internet: Improbable Research: Feline Reactions to ...

Technology Rich and Innovative Poor

Cleaning off my desktop this morning, I found this pdf from Alan November, that I've been meaning to write about on this blog. The original post from November Learning is at this link.   Written in January 2015, "Clearing the Confusion between Technology Rich and Innovative Poor: Six Questions" is an important, on-going discussion for every teacher and school leader, well worth looking at each school year. It begins "In a recent webinar, more than 90% of school leaders responded that they were ...