Theatre Performance and Production Presentation (TPPP) – Game

By Wednesday, March 30, 2011 , , , , 0

This week in my IB Theatre class we played a game to try to make links between areas of the course, productions seen, theatre in the World practices research/performed/designer for etc. The goal was to explore the synthesis and analysis sections of the assessment, but also to make sure that we were talking about research we had applied practically, rather than just narrating.

Rules of the game

1. Complete the 12 spaces on the 12 cards below:

 

 

TIM example

Eg. Making a mask

 

 

 

 

 

TIM example 2

Eg. Preparing for a role

 

 

TIP example

Eg. Using a mask in performance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIP example

Eg. Performing Prospero in ‘The Tempest’

 

 

TIW

Eg. Wayang Kulit

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIW

Eg. Brecht and Epic Theatre

 

 

 

Practitioner 1

Eg. Meisner

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practitioner 2

Eg. Artaud

 

 

Example of ensemble work

Eg. Devising a piece at a theatre festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

WILD

 

 

Performance seen 1

Eg. ‘Macbeth’ at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance seen 2 (contrasting)

Eg. ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dream coat’, Musical at a the school

 

2. Add one experience to the WILD card that you hope to play and maybe use as one of the two starting points for your real TPPP presentation. This can be a repeat of any of the other areas already covered on the cards.

3. Cut up your cards and fan them out in your hand, as if you are playing a game of cards.

4. Sit around a table with 3-4 other players

5. Player 1 puts down a card and explains their own practical work in relation to the card.

6. Player 2, to their left, then places another card down that LINKS to an aspect of what player 1 said.

7. Player 3 links to player 2

 

The game continues until one student has lost all their cards, they are the winner!

If a student cannot make a connection to what the previous player said, and therefore not go, they say ‘Blackout’.

 

2 Comments
  • Mike Pasternak
    May 31, 2011

    Great game fostering the first stage of linking work.

  • Fenella
    June 28, 2011

    I am glad that you found it useful. It is also a valuable tool for getting students to articulate their work, which they rarely do to their peers.

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