Recent Posts by Garrett Nagle

Heatwaves

By Monday, August 26, 2019 No tags 0

Many parts of the Northern Hemisphere have experienced heatwaves over the last month. Gallargues-le-Mountueux recorded France’s highest ever temperature of 45.9°C, beating the existing record by 1.8°C. Cambridge recorded the highest temperature ever in the UK. In June, the summit Mount Blanc recorded a temperature of 7°C, whereas normally it would have been below 0°C. Records were broken across Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Spain. The impacts of heatwaves are often underestimated. Images of hurricanes and floods may have a greater impact, ...

Migration in Myanmar

By Friday, August 23, 2019 No tags 0

Myanmar has experienced a surge in migration over the last decade. Many were forced to abandon their homes following Cyclone Nargis is 2008. However, the lifting of restrictions on internal migration, and the attraction of foreign investment has led to a rapid increase in the number of migrants to urban areas, and an increase in the economy of around 6% annually. The garment sector is one of Myanmar’s strongest parts of the economy, with exports of clothes and shows increasing ...

Conquering Everest

By Wednesday, July 31, 2019 No tags 0

In recent weeks, there has been a number of concerns raised about the number of climbers on Mount Everest, and the number of deaths, as well as the pollution of the environment by discarded equipment and the number of dead bodies left on the mountain. Everest is an extreme environment, but is proving increasingly popular for tourists. Once the preserve of elite climbers, now it is becoming the focus for many inexperienced climbers who want a thrill, and can afford ...

Combating the globalisation of waste management in south-east Asia

By Monday, July 29, 2019 No tags 0

For a long-time, south-east Asia and other parts of West Africa have accepted waste from the world’s rich nations and recycled, reused or dumped it in their own environment. Even today, there are containers full of unwanted waste sitting in. However, these countries are increasing against the dumping of rich nations’ waste in emerging economies (i.e. their own. Even the UN has called for a control on global plastic dumping in poorer countries (https://www.no-burn.org/brscop). "Collectors' Work" by Ikhlasul Amal is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0  In ...

TreeSisters and reforestation

By Wednesday, July 24, 2019 No tags 0

In March 2019 the UN declared a Decade of Ecosystem Restoration and aims to reforests 350 million ha (around 865 million acres) by 2030. The advantages of restored ecosystems are many – slowing down global warming by capturing and storing carbon, increasing rainfall, providing clean water, improving air quality and providing sources of natural capital. It is believed that some eco-system restoration could account for over one-third of the greenhouse gas emissions reduction that are needed to keep global temperature ...

Carmichael coal mine, Queensland, Australia

By Monday, July 22, 2019 No tags 0

The development of the Carmichael coal mine in the Galilee Basin, Queensland, Australia was given the go ahead by the Queensland government in June this year. The mine is controversial for many reasons. First, it is on land that was home to an indigenous Aboriginal population, who have been forced off their land. Second, the Galilee Basin is one of the world’s largest untapped supplies of thermal coal (the type used in power stations). Burning it will release vast amounts ...

Soil Conservation

Soil conservation measures 95% of the world’s food is produced on soil One-third of the UK’s soils are degraded One million hectares (36% of arable land in the UK is at risk from erosion. According to the UK environment secretary, Michael Gove, in some parts of the country, the UK’s soils may only be able to support farming for a further 30-40 years. Conservation agriculture aims to restore soil quality by increasing biodiversity, organic matter and soil fertility. It does not involve any ploughing of ...

Penguins in St Kilda, Melbourne

With over 50% of the world’s population living in urban areas, urbanization is one of the main threats to biodiversity. Some plant and animal species may thrive in urban areas, whereas others find the pressures of urbanization challenging. Urbanization has been linked with local extinctions. The little penguin (Eudyptula minor) (AKA blue or fairy penguins) has colonized an area by the St Kilda breakwater in Melbourne harbour. The colony is only a few kilometres from Melbourne’s CBD. The birds are ...

Cyclone Idai

Cyclone Idai struck Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe in March 2019 affecting up to 2.6 million people. In Mozambique, some 1.85 million people have been affected and in Malawi around 900,000. Around 130,000 people have been displaced in Mozambique, and around 90,0000 in Malawi. The final toll of the cyclone will not be known for many months, perhaps ever. This was the worst cyclone to affect the area since February 2000 when the region was affected by three cyclone in just ...

Venezuela: How and Why Did It All Go So Wrong?

Venezuela was, until relatively recently, one of the richest countries in Latin America. Due to its vast oil reserves, and the revenue they brought in, they were able fund food subsidies health care and education programmes. Under the presidency of Hugo Chavez (1999–2013) unemployment and poverty halved and personal incomes doubled. Chavez nationalized the oil industry and used the profits for welfare programmes. Chavez dies in 2013 and was replaced Nicolas Maduro, who continued with the spending programme. However, the price ...

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