Using Public Domain Images

In August I wrote about how to cite  Creative Commons photos.  Today I'd like to investigate how or why to cite Public Domain photos.  The following is not to be taken as legal advice, but as general guidelines for academic work, in a school setting. Rights are country-specific, so there is no "one size fits all" discussion of this topic.  Wikipedia begins the page on Public Domain with this paragraph: "Works in the public domain are those whose exclusive intellectual property rights ...

Separate the wheat from the chaff

In June I wrote a post for this blog titled Can this be real? about altered images, or misrepresenting images. Today in my ECIS Library Forum discussion thread,  a colleague in Switzerland posted about the explosion of fake academic journals. In the IB world, we are all involved in promoting digital citizenship, responsibility, honesty and integrity: We often use unusual but authentic, hoax, or "joke" websites like the following to teach or learn about "reliability" on the internet: Improbable Research: Feline Reactions to ...

Google – a new look!

Last month a new logo appeared on our screens in a new child-like typeface 'Product Sans'. In its simplicity, it is the most significant change in Google's logo history not only in design, but in the impact that it may have. This new design is intended to look good everywhere across all platforms and even the smallest of screen sizes. Change is not new to Google. Google has brought many new services over the years that have had significant impact our ...

Creating Silence-Spaces in Schools

I just recently purchased good noise-cancelling headphones to block the roar of motors and the general noise whenever traveling on planes. The headphones are simply brilliant because, not only do they block in-coming noise so that the sound from on-board systems can be clearly heard, but they also block other passenger from being distracted by what I am listening to. Without these headsets I found that I was forced to turn up the sound controls to full volume and was constantly ...

How should I cite this photo?

I recently read a blog post that featured this cute picture of 2 meerkats.  I couldn't see an image credit under the photo, so I looked at the bottom of the page, and found "Image source: Pixabay " This did not tell me enough about the image.  Clicking on the link, I learned that Pixabay is an online source of Creative Commons and stock images.  By doing a Google search for that image, I could find the precise URL of the meerkat image, https://pixabay.com/en/meerkat-animal-wild-wildlife-255564/ (as well as 402 ...

Credit Where Credit is Due

Part of being a principled scholar, an  honest internet user, and an good digital citizen means giving credit to the other people's work which  you use in your own.  In this post, we will talk about images, though any media can be licensed. Of course, you have chosen images that are licensed for re-use (a Creative Commons license) or are in the public domain.  How are you going to format the image credit? To properly attribute a Creative Commons image you should Name the title (if given) and author ...

Can that be real?

When reading a news post on the web, I often have occasion to ask myself "Can that be real?" or "Is this true?" and I'm often thinking about the image accompanying the post (as well as the post itself). "Can that be real?" can have two meanings - does this image come from the context the text describes, and/or has it been "photoshopped" - altered in some way. Luke Winkie has written a very informative post about 3 easy ways to tell if a ...

How much data is created in a minute?

When considering on-going uploads 24/7 from the world, means Big Data that ticks over numbers at an incredible rate. The following infographic was created by Domo and is posted in the blog on their website. It shows the amount of content that is created on the web in a minute! We have to step back to see the overall cross-section of what kind of content is being created and where on the web. The quetion is what kind of data ...

Two heads are better than one

In a recent post my colleague Barbara Stefanics highlighted collaborative learning in a studying-for-exams situation.  About the same time, I read Stephen Down's presentation on Cooperation and Collaboration, which lead me to explore the similarities and differences of cooperation and collaboration in a classroom setting, and how technology might support the two. The  terms cooperation and collaboration are often used rather loosely in the classroom to describe some sort of group work.  Downes summarises the terms this way his presentation: When collaborating, people ...

ATL Skills and Technology

Approaches to Teaching and Learning in the Diploma Programme (pre-publication guide) and the associated website focus on 5 categories for developing ATL skills across IB programmes. What is the intent of the Guide? To focus on strategies, skills and attitudes that will support students in developing the attributes in the Learner Profile, enhance their learning and better prepare students for their DP assessments and future endeavors. Some of these areas can be supported well through the use of technology and especially ...