The case of the missing umbrella:

The most universal definition of knowledge is that the latter is ‘justified true belief’, meaning that whatever information we think we possess must be corroborated by sufficient evidence but also, and just as importantly, by an inner conviction that, what we know, is actually the case. In our conscious life, we may, indeed, be fully aware of our home address or the year of the battle of Hastings. We simply know that we know such facts. However, our ordinary life ...

Sartre, the phenomenological tourist

 Sartre does not regard water as a friendly, natural element but as another foreign body, imposed on his senses and carrying negative connotations of sliminess and viscosity. He had, in fact, a particular aversion to all sea-food and when he suffered from the prolonged side-effects of a bad mescaline experience, he was haunted by images of giant lobsters pursuing him in his waking hours. The location of his novel Nausea is Bouville, literally, ‘Mud-city’, an hostile sea-side resort, closer to ...