The Shape of Things to Come (in 2022)

The Visual Arts Curriculum Review—and the Shape of Things to Come! Things to Come, via YouTube The Shape of Things to Come is a work of science fiction by H. G. Wells, published in 1933, which speculates on future events from 1933 until the year 2106. In the book, a world state is established as the solution to humanity's problems. (Wikipedia)   Actually, ‘the shape of things to come’ - in the context of this blog - is more specifically related to the ...

From the Ridiculous to the Sublime: The Visual Elaboration of Ideas

The Ridiculous (or at least, misguided) As an exhibition moderator I sometimes encounter work that seems to be based on a misinterpretation of the visual arts course. Of course the work is not really ‘ridiculous’, but let’s say it might be a little misguided. For example, in one case a student submitted (as artworks in their exhibition) a single Lego brick, and Lego ‘Batman’ and ‘Superman’ figures. Source: Wikimedia Obviously, there is no technical competence involved here: the Lego belonged to the student’s ...

Reminders for November session schools

If you are teaching in a “November session” school, October is a busy month! Here are some reminders: IBIS upload deadlines: 10 Oct         Predicted Grades and Internal Assessment marks 20 Oct            Internal Assessment (Exhibition) upload 30 Oct            Comparative Studies and Process Portfolio upload   Exhibition Reminders Students can use as many or as few processes/techniques as they like: there are no restrictions in the exhibition criteria for the range of media used. Students will not be penalised for only using ...

ART AND CONCEPT: What’s in a Glass of Water?

This post is about the visual arts course with reference to contemporary art, conceptual qualities, conceptual art and found objects ***The visual arts “Conceptual Qualities” criterion does not necessarily mean Conceptual Art, and Conceptual Art does not necessarily mean Found Objects. In the recent examination session a number of students went down a strongly ‘conceptual’ route and having chosen that route then went down the avenue marked ‘Found Objects’. CONCEPTUAL ART “Conceptual art can be – and can look like – almost anything. This ...

EXHIBITION ISSUES (part 3)

REFLECTING ON EXHIBITION FILES PART 3: In my last two visual arts teacher Blog posts (June and July) I discussed issues and aspects of exhibitions submitted for moderation that I’d seen as an examiner. This is the third and final post relating to this. Some of those previous 'issues' included teacher comments, the value of trauma, exhibition photographs and size and scale (etc) and might have reflected a misunderstanding of some aspects of the course. This month I am continuing this ...

CONCEPTUAL QUALITIES (and experimentation, cliché, objet trouvé & the senses)

Conceptual art can be stimulating, provocative and even fun, so it’s no surprise that DP visual arts students occasionally upload files for their final assessment  that have an emphasis on idea and concept rather than, say, technical skill. They are often in the form of a found object – a feather, a glove, a light-bulb, a chess piece, rubbish, a clock, a computer circuit board, dead flowers - not forgetting, of course, Barbie (etc.) They all represent something and - given the ...

The FINAL VERSION of the Visual Arts Guide is here!

Hello teachers! Well, the final version of our new visual arts guide has finally been published, and can be found on the OCC. To save you the trouble of carefully reading and comparing the ‘Pre-publication’ version and the new final version to see if there are any changes, I can tell you that there is one significant difference between the pre-pub and the final: in the assessment critereia, to be precise the EXHIBITION CRITERIA In the OLD Pre-publication guide Part 3: Exhibition OLD VERSION SL ...