Rise in Infections Due to Chickens

The rising trend of raising backyard chickens in US cities and suburbs is bringing with it huge increase in the number of illnesses from poultry-related diseases, at least one of them fatal. Between January 2017 and October 2017, over 1,100 people contracted salmonella poisoning from chickens and ducks in 48 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Almost 250 were hospitalized and one person died. The rate was four times higher than in 2015. The CDC estimates that the actual ...

Electric Vehicles in China

China wants to lead the world in the manufacture and use of clean-energy cars, and to achieve this it will need to ensure research and development in battery production. Batteries have become vital to the manufacture of clean energy cars. As part of China’s industry development plan (April 2017), the government pledged to promote research and development of key battery cell parts and improve management structures in the industry. Batteries are at the heart of clean energy vehicles because they are ...

Chocolate industry destroying rainforest in Cote d’Ivoire

The world’s chocolate industry is driving deforestation on a devastating scale in West Africa. As global demand for chocolate booms, ‘dirty’ beans from deforested national parks have entered big business supply chains. As much as 40% of the world’s cocoa comes from Cote d’Ivoire, and the rainforest cover has been reduced by more than 80% since 1960. The chocolate industry has many small-scale farmers who grow cocoa on plantations, many of which are illegal as they are in national parks or protected ...

Saudi women allowed to drive

Clerics in Saudi Arabia, the birthplace of Islam, have long struggled to justify the kingdom’s decades-old ban on women driving. None could cite a verse in the Koran to justify barring women from driving a vehicle. On September 26th the Kingdom decided to lift the ban. The decision was welcomed by women and many men. It will give Saudi women a freedom that others take for granted. It will have economic benefits, too, sparing families the cost of hiring a (male) ...

Ageing population in South Korea

Earlier this year, scientists predicted that women born in South Korea in 2030 will live, on average, until they are 90, thereby over-taking Japan in terms of female life expectancy. Basic demographic indicators Age structure % of the population 0-14 years 13.45% 15-24 years 13.08% 25-54 years 45.93% 55-64 years 14.01% 65 years + 13.53% Median age 41.2 years Crude birth rate 8.4% Crude death rate 5.8% Life expectancy 82.4 years (female 85.8 years, male 79.3 years) (Source CIA World Factbook) The study suggests that South Koreans will experience the greatest rise in life expectancy in the industrialised world, ...

Wetlands in Ireland

Wetlands are lands covered by water, and include lakes, rivers, marshes, fens, bogs and other water bodies whether natural or artificial, permanent or temporary. The water in wetlands may be still, flowing, fresh, salty or brackish. Wetlands are found throughout the world in low-lying areas in particular, but also in some high areas. They are particularly important in some LEDCs as a source of food (rice paddies, for example, as well as sources of fish and shellfish. Wetlands perform many ...

Soil and water pollution in China

Soil and water pollution is an increasing problem in China. Soil contamination occurs in most countries with a lot of farmland, heavy industry and mining. In Ukraine, for example, which has all three, about 8% of the land is contaminated. However, China is the world’s largest producer of food and of heavy industrial commodities such as steel and cement. China’s soil contamination is so great that it is impossible to remove all the contaminants. The country has many brownfield sites (contaminated ...

Japan’s changing demography

Japan’s ageing population is having a number of impacts – some demographic, some social and economic and even some technological! Japan has entered a vicious cycle of low fertility and low spending that has led to a huge decline in lost GDP and a population decline of 1 million people, all since 2012. One commentator has suggested that it is death of the Japanese family. A 2016 study conducted by a Japanese research firm found that even though nearly 70% of ...

Changes in the number of people living in absolute poverty

In 1981 some 42% of the world’s population were extremely poor. Since then the number of people in absolute poverty has fallen by about 1 billion. By 2013, the most recent year for which reliable data exist, just 10.7% of the world’s population was poor (living on less than $1.90 a day at 2011 purchasing-power parity). The World Bank’s estimate for the number of people living in absolute poverty 2016 is 9.1%. It took Britain about a century, from the 1820s ...

PRE IB: Getting ahead in IB Geography

This blog was written by experienced Geographer Garrett Nagle.  You can read more student and teacher blogs by Garrett here. The new Geography syllabus, which will be taught from September 2017 and examined for the first time in May 2019 begins with a quote from an IB Student from the British School in Rio de Janeiro: ‘Geography is the only subject that has given me the skills to interpret and understand reality in a way I could not imagine before and ...