It’s all in the detail

Mathematics, as you will know from Theory of Knowledge, is at the top of the tree of knowledge. It is self-referential - that is, its theorems do not need to be proven by reference to the real world, but instead by starting with other axioms and theorems. Of course, maths has many real-world applications, and if you are starting out on the new Applications and Interpretations course, then you will spend a lot of time solving real-word problems. Many of the ...

The new IB Diploma Maths syllabus

All IB Diploma students have to follow a maths course at either standard or higher level. Until now, there were three choices: Maths HL, a tough(ish) course for good mathematicians; Maths SL, better for those who didn't want the standard of maths required at the higher level, but still needed, or enjoyed, a course with a reasonable level of mathematical content; and Maths Studies SL, for those, frankly, who weren't mathematically orientated, and which contained topics such as financial maths ...

Optical Illusions

There are many types of optical illusion but, in every case, the brain is being fooled by what the eyes see. In a short blog such as this I can only show a small set of examples from a limited number of categories but, if you are as fascinated by these as I am, a short web search will reveal countless more. It's also the case that some optical illusions can only be created using paper, and won't work on-screen. Illusory ...

Pythagorean Triples

We are all familiar with Pythagoras' Theorem: that if a triangle with sides of length a, b, and c is right-angled, then a2 + b2 = c2. (You can find a proof of the theorem in an earlier blog here). If the sides all have integer values, then the numbers a, b, c form a "Pythagorean triple" - the simplest of which is 3, 4, 5 since 32 + 42 = 52. Further triples can be formed by simple multiplication: thus, 6, 8, 10 ...

An Easy Mathematical Trick

Start by writing the number 1089 on a piece of paper and put it in your pocket. Now get someone to choose a three digit number where the last digit is at least 2 less than the first digit. Turn it round to form a new three digit number, then subtract it from the first one. For example, 481 − 184 = 297. Now turn the new number round to form a fourth three digit number, and add it to the third. 297 + ...

Five Top Maths Tips

Layla Moran, an OSC Academic Manager and IB Maths and Physics teacher, imparts her top five Maths tips to help you get through your exams. 1. Get your calculator sorted The IB has very strict guidelines about what can and cannot be on your calculator. If an invigilator clears it during the exam, are you confident you know how to change the settings to what you like quickly? TIP: Practicing this is worth spending 10 minutes of your time doing. Ask your maths teacher to show you ...