MacTutor History of Mathematics

In my wanderings around the internet I came across a superb resource for anyone interested in, or needing information about, mathematicians, the history of mathematics, mathematical chronologies – even a 'famous curves' index. This is the MacTutor History of Mathematics site, created by John J. O'Connor and Edmund F. Robertson of the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Under 'Mathematicians of the Day' there's an index of those who were born or died on every day of the year. I'm amazed ...

What Do You Get Asked in University Interviews?

Some universities interview applicants. In the UK, the Oxford and Cambridge interviews are an important part of the application process, Imperial College and UCL tend to interview the majority of applicants. In the US, many Ivy League colleges also carry out interviews. But what should you expect, and how can you prepare? Interviewers stress that they are not testing knowledge, which would be unfair, given that applicants come from many different backgrounds and educational systems. The purpose, says Oxford, is to ...

Devising Companies to Explore

When you start looking for a devising company that you want to explore, it helps to know a little bit about them and also have some videos of their work to watch. Over the last few weeks I have been gathering ideas from many teachers about companies they would like to explore with their students, so here are a few that you may want to look at yourself or as a class. I hope that some of these companies and ...

Putting the “Wow” into Magic Squares!

I'm sure that at some time in your life you've come across a magic square; usually a 4 x 4 table filled in with numbers where every row and column adds to give the same total. Here's an example where the total is 34 and, as a bonus, the two leading diagonals add to give 34 as well.           Well, that's quite nice, but hasn't really got the wow factor, has it? The next one has, though: same numbers, filled in differently.           It's ...

Great Mathematicians 6: Isaac Newton

Newton is such a giant in the history of Maths and Physics that it isn't really possible to do him justice in a short blog post. King's School Grantham: original building Source: Acabashi, via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) The basic facts first. Newton was born in Lincolnshire, in eastern England, in 1642. His early family life was unhappy, but he had the fortune to go to a good school - the King's School in Grantham - which gave him an ...

A Wider World (Part 1)

Assuming that you're on this site because you're interested in the kind of reading and writing that your literature and language courses may or may not involve, these three (or maybe more) blog entries will be looking outside and inside of conventional 'English class' materials to provide new directions and unpack some older ones. Widening our sense of graphic novels  Take a look at these four graphic narratives. A Game for Swallows Born in the midst of the Lebanese war when the city ...

Forced Marriages in Britain

According to the Guardian newspaper, over 3,500 reports of forced marriage were made to the police during a three-year period. Charities believe that there are thousands more victims living in conditions of modern slavery in homes across the UK. Data from the Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation recorded 3,546 reports between 2014 and 2016. However, some experts believe that this is merely the tip of the iceberg. During the same period, a UK helpline run by a different NGO received ...

The Paradox of the Condemned Prisoner

The prison governor goes to visit a condemned prisoner in his cell. He tells him that he is due to be executed at midday one day in the following month, but he won't know in advance which day it is. Actually, condemned prisoners are a bit of a gloomy subject for a maths blog: let's change the scene to a school and start again! The head teacher of a school announces that there will be a fire drill at midday one day ...

The Maths Behind Record Breaking

I came across an interesting article the other day looking at the link between record breaking and the "harmonic series" $1 + \frac{1}{2} + \frac{1}{3} + \frac{1}{4} + \frac{1}{5} + ....$. If you went through a list of 100 random numbers, have a guess as to how often would you expect to break the record for the largest number so far? Let's take a simpler example. Here are 10 random numbers: 3, 8, 5, 7, 2, 5, 3, 9, 1, 7 Clearly the first number ...

Patterns in Pascal’s Triangle

One of the great joys in Maths is exploring something seemingly very simple and finding layers upon layers of complexity, and connections with other areas of Maths which at first sight appear to be totally separate. I'm sure you have come across Pascal's triangle; here it is: To create each new row, start and finish with 1, and then each number in between is formed by adding the two numbers immediately above. Pattern 1:   One of the most obvious patterns is the ...