Using Public Domain Images

In August I wrote about how to cite  Creative Commons photos.  Today I'd like to investigate how or why to cite Public Domain photos.  The following is not to be taken as legal advice, but as general guidelines for academic work, in a school setting. Rights are country-specific, so there is no "one size fits all" discussion of this topic.  Wikipedia begins the page on Public Domain with this paragraph: "Works in the public domain are those whose exclusive intellectual property rights ...

Separate the wheat from the chaff

In June I wrote a post for this blog titled Can this be real? about altered images, or misrepresenting images. Today in my ECIS Library Forum discussion thread,  a colleague in Switzerland posted about the explosion of fake academic journals. In the IB world, we are all involved in promoting digital citizenship, responsibility, honesty and integrity: We often use unusual but authentic, hoax, or "joke" websites like the following to teach or learn about "reliability" on the internet: Improbable Research: Feline Reactions to ...

Technology Rich and Innovative Poor

Cleaning off my desktop this morning, I found this pdf from Alan November, that I've been meaning to write about on this blog. The original post from November Learning is at this link.   Written in January 2015, "Clearing the Confusion between Technology Rich and Innovative Poor: Six Questions" is an important, on-going discussion for every teacher and school leader, well worth looking at each school year. It begins "In a recent webinar, more than 90% of school leaders responded that they were ...

Can that be real?

When reading a news post on the web, I often have occasion to ask myself "Can that be real?" or "Is this true?" and I'm often thinking about the image accompanying the post (as well as the post itself). "Can that be real?" can have two meanings - does this image come from the context the text describes, and/or has it been "photoshopped" - altered in some way. Luke Winkie has written a very informative post about 3 easy ways to tell if a ...

Privacy

I’ve been trying to write this post about privacy, digital privacy, “privacy as a human right”, the "right to be forgotten", and social networking,  for awhile now. But it seems every time I sit down to put words on “paper”, a new facet of the discussion is brought to my attention by a blog post, video, news story... First, we should consider the concept of privacy. Privacy can be described as a state in which one is not observed or disturbed by other ...

Privacy

I’ve been trying to write this post about privacy, digital privacy, “privacy as a human right”, the "right to be forgotten", and social networking,  for awhile now. But it seems every time I sit down to put words on “paper”, a new facet of the discussion is brought to my attention by a blog post, video, news story... First, we should consider the concept of privacy. Privacy can be described as a state in which one is not observed or disturbed by other ...

What’s in a MOOC?

What is a MOOC? This video from Dave Cormier will explain:   eW3gMGqcZQc   As with so many things, when looking for a good beginning introduction, I come to Wikipedia for a basic definition of  MOOC: "A Massive Open Online Course (MOOC; /muːk/) is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the webIn addition to traditional course materials such as videos, readings, and problem sets, MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). MOOCs are a recent development in distance education ...

Have you enrolled in a MOOC?

What is a MOOC? This video from Dave Cormier will explain:   [videos file="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3gMGqcZQc" width="450" height="253"] As with so many things, when looking for a good beginning introduction, I come to Wikipedia for a basic definition of  MOOC: "A Massive Open Online Course (MOOC; /muːk/) is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the webIn addition to traditional course materials such as videos, readings, and problem sets, MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). MOOCs are a ...

My most useful web tool

The most prevalent, and overwhelmingly useful tool I use on the Internet is not a website, not email, not shared documents or photos or videos or music, but a "behind the scenes" bit of code: RSS feeds. First, what is RSS? RSS - Really Simple Syndication "uses a family of standard web feed formats to publish frequently updated information: blog entries, news headlines, audio, video. An RSS document (called "feed", "web feed", or "channel") includes full or summarised text, and metadata, like publishing date and author's name.  RSS feeds ...

I’m an artist! Why does IB care about where my ideas come from?

Because ideas come from somewhere and if you copy or use images or ideas without acknowledging the sources you may not get your Diploma. Admittedly, it’s complicated. d9ryPC8bxqE To start with, almost nothing is new or original. Artists see stuff, and may register it consciously or unconsciously, and a week later some version of what they saw might appear in their artwork. Did they rip it off? Have they stolen someone else’s ideas? Who knows – after all, everything’s a remix. The  (great!) YouTube video titled ...