Introductions and Conclusions (Part 2)

First, let's review some advice from Part 1 of Introductions and Conclusions: ***The most important factor is being aware that you are talking to someone who does not know you and does not know what you think about the material, whether it’s a work you have studied or one you are seeing for the first time. SO: INTRODUCTIONS MATTER! You need to let the reader know: what particular text(s) you intend to write about what your angle on them is, and even, possibly, how you ...

The Written Assignment, once more

From facilitating online workshops and moderating examiners for the Part 1 assessment, I frequently observe that there are still hurdles for both teachers and students and those who mark their work.  The IB assessment office is well aware of this, and in response has arranged a screencast to help examiners, particularly those who may not teach this course or this component.  While the primary target audience for the screencast is indeed examiners, the material is also now available to teachers ...

3 Easy Marks for Your Written Assignment

When you are  facing just what you can do to get those three marks for a good Reflective Statement for your Written Assignment, you best guide is the question that is asked in Criterion A. This is the central question the examiner will use to  mark this part of the submission. And that question is: "To what extent does the student show how their understanding of cultural and contextual elements was developed through the interactive oral?" So what you want to ...