Two Conceptions of Philosophy: Williamson vs Scruton (Part 2)

In his response to Roger Scruton’s conception of philosophy, published in The Times Literary Supplement, dated 3 November 2017, Professor Williamson adopts a measured and rigorous approach, expected of a logician and philosopher of language. He first finds fault with his colleague’s assumption that the subject of experience ‘is not part of the empirical world’. What of the study of historical agents whose motivations can, indeed, be analysed scientifically by ‘adapting one’s methods to the nature of the problem (at ...

On conservative philosophers

Is being a conservative philosopher a contradiction in terms? After all, isn’t Philosophy, from its very beginnings in Greece, the celebration of the human spirit and human nature as opposed to the religious ‘conservative’ view which had been accepted for generations until then? Can we brand Plato as a ‘conservative’ thinker when his very ambition was to open the mind of his contemporaries to the perennial beauty of the world of Ideas? Conservatism is, in fact, a fairly recent concept which ...