Who’s an “Indian”?: classification and implications

Who’s indigenous? And does it matter? These are significant questions, with significant answers. They are relevant to TOK both through the new area of knowledge, indigenous knowledge, and an old area of knowledge, ethics – as well as to all the ways of knowing involved in classifying our concepts. Two stories in this past month’s news bring them to life: a court contest in Canada about who is classified as “aboriginal” and a conflict in Tanzania over whether indigenous people ...

TOK classification: the jerk

After my last post on classification (July 7, "Nazi poster child was Jewish"), I thought you deserved a lighter one. (After all, for many of us, summer holiday has begun!) I’m picking out the same central topic – classification of people – but this time with a laugh: “The essence of jerkitude. If it seems like everyone around you is an idiot, you may be a jerk.” In the author’s “theory of jerks”, he defines his term, describes the phenomenon he ...